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Spinal Manipulation

When the body becomes injured it tries to protect itself by guarding the area that is injured. It does this by putting up barriers that can prevent the body from healing. The way chiropractors help with remove these barriers and help the body heal is with the use of the spinal manipulation. These barriers can include tension in muscles, adhesion in tissues and joints and pressure on nerves from other tissue. When these barriers are removed the body then can start to heal itself. The spinal manipulation allows for increased range of motion, decrease in muscle tension and removing the pressure off the nerves making it possible for what everyone is looking for, pain relief. Pain relief may not happen at that moment but you will soon start to notice changes in movement, activities start to become less painful than before, or even just a better night’s sleep. These changes start off small and then start to become more and more noticeable as your body begins healing.

Spinal manipulation is accomplished by the chiropractor using his hands and guiding your body in the right direction. Most of the time these adjustments occur in the spine but can also be used on different joints in the arms and legs. Sometimes there is a sound that is associated with spinal manipulation and that is just the sound of gases in the joint being released. This is the same sound that happens when someone “cracks” their knuckles it is just in a different location of the body. Spinal manipulation can involve a quick movement of the hands over a short distance in order to break through these barriers that are preventing your injury from healing. Sometimes just the pressure from the chiropractor placing his hands in the area can cause the sound even with light pressure.

Recent studies continue show that spinal manipulation is a safe and effective why to treat low back pain.

Source

http://annals.org/aim/article/2603228/noninvasive-treatments-acute-subacute-chronic-low-back-pain-clinical-practice

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2616395